Universal child benefits: The curious case of Mongolia

Up to now, Mongolia has been famous for Genghis Khan, nomadic herders and grand wrestling competitions in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. But, it can now add to its list of fame the developing world’s only universal child grant!

Worldwide, close to one in seven countries provide non-contributory child benefits on a universal basis, primarily being European and a few other OECD countries (see map below). This means that they ...

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Affordable social security: the case of Uzbekistan

It is an article of faith among neoliberals that developing countries can afford to invest very little in social security. For example, in its Social Protection Strategy for Africa, the World Bank questions the fiscal affordability of universal pensions of southern Africa despite their relatively small budgets of between 0.5% and 1.5% of GDP. Neoliberals would also have us believe that higher levels of spending on social security will increase ...

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The Imperatives for Social Protection

This blog is written by Angela Adeboye, who is a Managing Partner at Alegna Global Partnerships in Nigeria. There, she focuses on the overall strategic direction of the management consultancy and financial advisory firm to deliver solutions across emerging markets. This article first appeared in This Day Live where Angela has a weekly column every Sunday.

As ...

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“Poor” Practice: The Stigmatisation of Families Living on Low Incomes

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

Let’s begin with some simple semantics: poor [bad] performance; poor [bad] quality; poor [shoddy] work; poor [weak] effort; etc. So, what do we mean when we talk about “poor people” or “the poor”? I’m struck by how – in discussions on social policy in many high-income countries – progressive writers often avoid ...

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Bangladesh: Social Unrest, Elections and a Failed Social Model

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development.

Bangladesh has just experienced troubled elections boycotted by the main opposition party, amid strikes and violence. It is not a happy country. Yet, in many respects, since independence the country has made good progress. While many commentators in the 1980s wrote off the country as a basket case, its economy has expanded: ...

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From Oliver Twist to Ethiopia’s PSNP: How did workfare become so productive?

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development.

“Productive” safety nets seem to be all the rage, with Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net (PSNP) spawning a crop of “wannabes” – such as the PSNPs of Mozambique and Tanzania – and significant enthusiasm among donor agencies. In fact, so popular are “productive” safety nets that low-income countries have been persuaded to take ...

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Disability Benefits: The Neglected Social Security Instrument

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development. In this blog he discusses the importance of Disability Benefits and introduces Development Pathways’ new Disability Benefit Database.

A few years ago, I was in Kiribati – it’s in the Pacific, for those who don’t know – holding discussions with a group of persons with ...

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The Taxman Cometh, Maybe: Corporate Tax Evasion and Global Poverty

Pooja Bhatia is a journalist for Ozy, where a version of this article originally appeared. She’s written for the New York Times, the Economist, and the New York Review of Books, among others, and wants to be bicoastal when she grows up.

...

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Uganda’s Old Age Pension: Who Benefits?

This blog is written by Fareeha Ibrahim, who works on food security and rural development for the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID). This research and its findings are unrelated to the author’s employment with AusAID. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the views or policy of AusAID or of the Australian Government. Her contribution to this research was self-funded.

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Social Security and its Contribution to Economic Growth

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

The main purpose of social security is to reduce poverty and strengthen the resilience of poor and vulnerable families through transfers that increase incomes. Yet, this comes at a cost, which is usually financed either through taxation or via contributions from individuals. While there are schools of thought that believe these costs ...

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Good girls and good education: avoiding the “bad life” in Rwanda

Rebecca Calder is a Senior Social Development Specialist at Development Pathways. She works extensively on adolescent girl issues.  This blog is in response to International Day of the Girl. In Rebecca’s next Pathway’s Perspective she will look at some of the things that are going wrong, and right, with girls’ education.

 “We have sex to stay in school, and we want to go to school so ...

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A recap: the contents, and discontents, of Graduation

Development Pathways has launched a blog series entitled “the Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation” in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the last five weeks, Development Pathways has hosted a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs.

This summary blog is written by Karishma Huda, a Senior Social ...

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The Graduation Pilot in Ethiopia – The sought after dream of ‘sustainable livelihoods’

Anasuya Sengupta is a Senior Researcher for the CGAP – Ford Foundation Graduation Program. Since 2010, she has been conducting a qualitative longitudinal study with participants of the CGAP – Ford Foundation Graduation pilot in Ethiopia.

This blog is a response ...

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Graduation in Public Policy: Challenges and Trends

This blog is written by Tatiana Rincón, Latin America Coordinator for Fundación Capital’s Graduation Project and Austine Gasnier, Micro-entrepreneurship Specialist at Fundación Capital

Despite considerable economic ...

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What is the Evidence on “Graduation” Programmes?

This blog is written by Stephen Kidd, a Senior Social Policy Specialist at Development Pathways. He’s been told that people are bored with him saying that we need to examine the evidence and not the myths of social protection, so he’s promised he won’t say it this time.

How easy is it to “graduate” people out ...

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Graduation and Social Protection

This blog is written by Nicholas Freeland, an independent consultant. Nicholas graduated definitively from Cambridge University in 1978; but, in spite of (or perhaps because of) a lengthy subsequent career as a development consultant, he still doesn’t feel that he has graduated from poverty.

Graduation (noun), the receiving or conferring of an academic degree or diploma.

Graduation is a definitive moment ...

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Graduation into Social Protection: access to social assistance, not off of it, is critical for the ultrapoor

This blog is written by Janet Heisey, Director of Technical and Strategic Alliances at Trickle Up. She’s contemplating graduation from summertime flip flops into fall fleece, but isn’t sure she’s ready.

There ...

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Dangerous Habits of Thought: why I fear ‘graduation’ and ‘resilience’

This blog is written by Naomi Hossain, a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies. She thought resilience was something to do with yoga, but now she knows it just means ignoring what hurts.

Shivers ran down my spine when I interviewed an official in Bangladesh ...

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Introducing “The Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation”: Development Pathways blog series

Development Pathways is launching a blog series entitled “the Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation” in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the next six weeks, Development Pathways will host a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs.

This introductory blog is written by  ...

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