Good girls and good education: avoiding the “bad life” in Rwanda

Rebecca Calder is a Senior Social Development Specialist at Development Pathways. She works extensively on adolescent girl issues.  This blog is in response to International Day of the Girl. In Rebecca’s next Pathway’s Perspective she will look at some of the things that are going wrong, and right, with girls’ education.

 “We have sex to stay in school, and we want to go to school so ...

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A recap: the contents, and discontents, of Graduation

Development Pathways has launched a blog series entitled “the Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation” in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the last five weeks, Development Pathways has hosted a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs.

This summary blog is written by Karishma Huda, a Senior Social ...

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The Graduation Pilot in Ethiopia – The sought after dream of ‘sustainable livelihoods’

Anasuya Sengupta is a Senior Researcher for the CGAP – Ford Foundation Graduation Program. Since 2010, she has been conducting a qualitative longitudinal study with participants of the CGAP – Ford Foundation Graduation pilot in Ethiopia.

This blog is a response ...

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Graduation in Public Policy: Challenges and Trends

This blog is written by Tatiana Rincón, Latin America Coordinator for Fundación Capital’s Graduation Project and Austine Gasnier, Micro-entrepreneurship Specialist at Fundación Capital

Despite considerable economic ...

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What is the Evidence on “Graduation” Programmes?

This blog is written by Stephen Kidd, a Senior Social Policy Specialist at Development Pathways. He’s been told that people are bored with him saying that we need to examine the evidence and not the myths of social protection, so he’s promised he won’t say it this time.

How easy is it to “graduate” people out ...

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Graduation and Social Protection

This blog is written by Nicholas Freeland, an independent consultant. Nicholas graduated definitively from Cambridge University in 1978; but, in spite of (or perhaps because of) a lengthy subsequent career as a development consultant, he still doesn’t feel that he has graduated from poverty.

Graduation (noun), the receiving or conferring of an academic degree or diploma.

Graduation is a definitive moment ...

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Graduation into Social Protection: access to social assistance, not off of it, is critical for the ultrapoor

This blog is written by Janet Heisey, Director of Technical and Strategic Alliances at Trickle Up. She’s contemplating graduation from summertime flip flops into fall fleece, but isn’t sure she’s ready.

There ...

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Dangerous Habits of Thought: why I fear ‘graduation’ and ‘resilience’

This blog is written by Naomi Hossain, a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies. She thought resilience was something to do with yoga, but now she knows it just means ignoring what hurts.

Shivers ran down my spine when I interviewed an official in Bangladesh ...

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Introducing “The Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation”: Development Pathways blog series

Development Pathways is launching a blog series entitled “the Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation” in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the next six weeks, Development Pathways will host a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs.

This introductory blog is written by  ...

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Childcare for Working Mothers: why is it not prominent on the international development agenda?

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

Increasingly, developed countries are recognising that free childcare needs to play a prominent role in employment and social protection policy. For example:

  • From August this year, all German children will have the right to a place in day-care to enable their mothers to ...

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The End of Welfare States?

In this guest blog, Francine Mestrum, Network Coordinator for Global Social Justice, discusses the European Council’s recent meeting in June 2013, where social protection is seen as a tool to develop human capital and drive economic growth- Is this the end of the welfare state in Europe?

In December 2012, the European ...

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Pro-Poor Policies and the Rise of an Alienated Middle Class in Developing Countries

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

From Turkey to Brazil, the middle class are out on the streets protesting. In a thought-provoking article, Francis Fukuyama argues that the cause of these protests is a growing middle class with aspirations that are not being ...

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The Ghosts of User Fees Past: exploring accountability for victims of a 30-year economic policy mistake

In this guest blog, Rick Rowden, doctoral candidate in Economic Studies and Planning at Jawaharlal Nehru University, discusses the World Bank’s health user fees and what the recent change in direction from the World Bank could mean for those affected by this policy. 

On May 21st, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim’s speech at the World Health Assembly in Geneva was notable for his sharp condemnation of ...

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Thailand’s Old Age Pension: an example of the importance of good quality analysis

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

I recently come across a draft report by the World Bank on Thailand’s old age pension system. The report states it is for consultation, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to provide a few thoughts and helpfully point out ...

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Means-testing the UK’s Winter Fuel Allowance: how does this contribute to our understanding of the political economy of social security?

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

The UK’s Labour Party has recently responded to the Conservative – or in theory, Coalition – government’s attacks on the social security system by trying to prove they can be even tougher. To prove it, they’ve decided to go after one of the UK’s few remaining inclusive ...

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The ADB’s Social Protection Index: what does it really tell us about social security provision in Asia?

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

 The recent release of the Asian Development Bank’s Social Protection Index (SPI) has generated much interest; it even merited a story in the Economist newspaper. However, little attention has been paid to the SPI’s definition of ...

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Is Latin America Transitioning from Poor Relief CCTs to a More Progressive and Inclusive Vision of Social Security?

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

Despite all the hype around poor relief conditional cash transfers (CCTs) in Latin America, the ideology underpinning social protection in the continent is shifting. While CCTs are targeted at the poor – with the result that the majority of the poor are excluded (see here for an  ...

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Social Security and the Growth of the Precariat

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

Guy Standing makes a lot of sense in a recent article he wrote for the Guardian. He argues that successive British governments have created a precariat, a growing sector of the population with minimal job security ...

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The rise and rise of neo-liberal social protection

The Just KIDDing blog is Dr. Stephen Kidd’s take on key issues in social policy in international development

Monday 1st April was not only April Fool’s day; it was also the day chosen by the British government to make the most drastic changes to the UK’s social security system in decades, throwing many poor people into even deeper poverty. People with disabilities were the hardest hit: ...

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