blog iconIntroducing “The Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation”: Development Pathways blog series

Development Pathways today launches a blog series entitled The Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the next six weeks, we will host a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs. There has...

blog iconDangerous Habits of Thought: why I fear ‘graduation’ and ‘resilience’

Shivers ran down my spine when I interviewed an official in Bangladesh about social protection last week. We had a friendly discussion about, among other things, why the Government of Bangladesh has shown such strong commitment to social protection – including taking out a US$0.5 billion soft loan with the World...

blog iconGraduation into Social Protection: access to social assistance, not off of it, is critical for the ultrapoor

There are various ways for economic development programmes to define graduation—and it’s not always ‘out’ of a programme. While policymakers rightly consider whether and how to augment the sustainability of social protection programmes through a productive component (including graduation initiatives), it is also worth considering how some programmes are simply...

blog iconWhat is the Evidence on ‘Graduation’ Programmes?

How easy is it to ‘graduate’ people out of poverty? In recent years, there has been a wave of so-called ‘graduation’ programmes in developing countries, all of which are derived from BRAC’s Targeting the Ultra-Poor (TUP) programme in Bangladesh. Claims are made by these schemes of a high proportion of...

blog iconThe Graduation Pilot in Ethiopia – The sought after dream of ‘sustainable livelihoods’

With a small number of 500 participants, REST tested the approach in Ethiopia as an effort to find pathways – not just out of extreme poverty – but out of what the state considers indefinite dependency on the Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP), one of the largest national safety nets in...

blog iconA recap: the contents, and discontents, of Graduation

Development Pathways launched a blog series entitled The Contents – and Discontents – of Graduation in order to further debate the pros and cons of graduation strategies.  Over the last five weeks, we hosted a weekly blog from practitioners and academics; advocates and critics; government implementers and NGOs. Our five-week blog series...

Publication IconGraduating Into — Not Out of — a National Social Security System

Graduation Programmes have gone a long way in helping many vulnerable families develop diversified sources of income, build up their assets and self-confidence, and be more resilient to shocks and...

Publication IconThe Misuse of the Term ‘Graduation’ in Social Policy

In our 14th Pathways Perspective, Stephen Kidd, Senior Social Policy Advisor, discusses why the term ‘graduation’ should be eliminated from international development discourse. The term ‘graduation’ conflates the two concepts...

blog iconTackling exclusion, pensions progress, citizen action: a year in review

2017 has been a busy year for Development Pathways. We have redoubled our efforts to share the experience and knowledge we have gained working on building the strategies and systems needed to ensure evidence-led, inclusive programmes that realise human rights. Our most-read resources reflect the evidence we have provided on the...