blog iconWhat lies behind the thinking of those driving development at the IMF?

The IMF’s Independent Evaluation Office rarely lives up to its pretention to operate in real independence from the Fund, as its name implies, writes Peter Bavkis.  One is hard-pressed to cite IEO reports that embrace thorough critiques of IMF policies, despite their frequency in academic circles and among civil society...

News IconCall to switch development funds from low-impact ‘poor relief’ to effective investment

Criticism in the UK media that the Government is exporting a welfare system for the poor to developing countries through financing cash transfer schemes should not be dismissed out of hand, claims Stephen Kidd, CEO of Development Pathways, in a new blog published by Oxfam.

blog iconFree at last! Kyrgyzstan’s liberation from poor relief, with universal social security for children

In April 2018, a new law will enter into force in Kyrgyzstan which abolishes its main poor relief scheme and replaces it with a system of universal child benefits. This is a major step forward in Kyrgyzstan’s attempt to build an inclusive, lifecycle social protection system, since the nation already...

blog iconRole of IMF-backed elimination of universal social protection in protests

Widespread protests in Iran have followed continued decline in real incomes in the country. Like the ITUC, several media have identified declining living standards and plans that would further worsen these as the root cause of the protests. For example, a New York Times article stated: “The initial catalyst for the anger...

News IconIMF urged to re-think loan conditions that hit social protection spending

4th July: Development Pathways joins over 50 groups in writing to the IMF to ask that it re-think the conditions that it applies to loans that reduce spending on social protection and other investments in people.

News IconDebate over universal basic income steps up as IMF weighs impacts

14th August: An IMF paper has backed universal basic income as a better way of supporting low-income households than existing safety net programmes when these are “inefficient”. The paper, using...

blog iconMongolia and Kyrgyzstan lose out in their struggle with the IMF over the targeting of child benefits

All those supporting inclusive social protection will be sad to hear that, in the past couple of months, Kyrgyzstan and Mongolia have both lost out to the International Monetary Fund in their struggles to establish universal child benefits. The IMF has obliged both countries to target their schemes at those...

blog iconSocial Protection through the Looking Glass: Lewis Carroll’s parable for the unwary

What can a 19th Century work of literary nonsense teach us about global social protection debates? To mark April Fools’ Day, our guest blogger Nicholas Freeland suggests that Lewis Carroll’s work The Walrus and the Carpenter can tell us more more about prevailing dogmas in the sector than you might imagine! Lewis Carroll...

blog iconThe IMF and Social Protection: A lost cause or is there hope?

For all its ambivalence, the IMF is a, if not the, key actor when it comes to social protection arrangements in low- and middle-income countries, writes Philip Alston.  In a new report that I will be presenting to the UN Human Rights Council on 21st June – but which has now...

Publication IconPro-Poor or Anti-Poor?

Stephen Kidd considers the growing role of the World Bank and IMF in shaping national social protection policies as questions are being asked about their approach to the issue.