blog iconIs Latin America Transitioning from Poor Relief CCTs to a More Progressive and Inclusive Vision of Social Security?

Despite all the hype around poor relief conditional cash transfers (CCTs) in Latin America, the ideology underpinning social protection in the continent is shifting. While CCTs are targeted at the poor – with the result that the majority of the poor are excluded (see here for an explanation) – a growing...

blog iconPro-Poor Policies and the Rise of an Alienated Middle-Class in Developing Countries

From Turkey to Brazil, the middle-class are out on the streets protesting. In a thought-provoking article, Francis Fukuyama argues that the cause of these protests is a growing middle class with aspirations that are not being realised. As he notes: “Newly arrived members of the middle-class are more likely to be...

blog iconGraduation in Public Policy: Challenges and Trends

Despite considerable economic progress in Latin America, as of 2012 there were still 66 million people living in extreme poor (close to 30% of the population). This underscores the importance of finding innovative and scalable ways to help people out of extreme poverty.  Despite dramatic advances in technology and means...

blog iconWhat is the Future of Bolsa Família?

Bolsa Família is often promoted as a model of good practice for social protection programmes in the developing world. As a Brazilian, in the short period of time that I’ve worked on international social protection, I’ve been surprised by how famous Bolsa Família is around the world and how it...

Publication IconBolsa unFAMILIAr

Senior Social Policy Specialists Stephen Kidd and Karishma Huda write about the misconceptions of Brazil’s conditional cash transfer, Bolsa Familia, in the ninth edition of our Pathways Perspectives publications. Our...

blog iconThe two lives of social protection: the tale of cash transfers and social security

Here’s a curious tale about two very different forms of social protection: one is much loved by researchers, the media and donors, but its charms are debatable; the other is too often shunned by academia, commentators and funders despite holding greater promise and staying-power. We could call them ‘cash transfers’...

News IconImportance of dignity to social protection implementation underlined in Guadalajara

4th September: Academia and international development experts have met in Mexico to discuss the social transformations required to eradicate poverty and significantly reduce inequality within and among countries. Participants discussing...

blog iconConditions and sanctions don’t work, and hinder the rights of the most vulnerable

A UK MP found “depressingly unsurprising” the finding that punishing people in their hour of greatest need is ineffective and ethically questionable. Indeed, the results of the five-year study on Welfare Conditionality, presented to Parliament last month, should surprise none of us. The evidence has been mounting for years that a punitive...

News IconGauntlet thrown down to social protection authorities to take forward realisation of rights

12th December: Social protection authorities can ensure programmes respect key human rights principles by assessing the impact on disadvantaged citizens and empowering them to seek redress. This is the message...

blog iconThe demise of Mexico’s Prospera programme: a tragedy foretold

Stephen Kidd looks at the recent shocking news that Mexico’s Prospera programme has been abolished and explains why it should come as a surprise to no-one. Stephen Kidd The big story in the social protection world last week was the news that Mexico’s Prospera programme is to be abolished after...