Sandra Kidd

Sarina Kidd

Social Policy Researcher

An international development practitioner with in-country experience in Peru, Paraguay and Zambia. She has expertise in anthropological and social policy research as well as advocating on indigenous rights. She oscillates between novel writing and wishing she lived in a novel. 

Sarina Kidd's Work

Publication Icon

Child disability benefits: An investment worth making

Children with disabilities are, arguably, the world’s most vulnerable children, evidence suggests. But it doesn’t have to be this way, as indicated by the evidence in this short paper. Child Disability...

READ MORE  
Publication Icon

Facing Our Future: Ageing in a Changing Uganda

The challenges and opportunities offered by a growth in older persons in Uganda are identified in this Government of Uganda report, released for International Day of Older Persons 2018. To...

READ MORE  
Old Persons Cash Transfer recipient Miriam
blog icon

Village Voices: Miriam sees end to stigma with Kenya’s Inua Jamii pension

Our Village Voices series shares research findings into Kenya’s Inua Jamii Senior Citizens’ pension scheme and what it means to one Rift Valley community. In this blog, Sarina Kidd discusses the experiences of a recipient of the Older Persons Cash Transfer. Miriam is seen as one of the lucky ones...

READ MORE  
Publication Icon

Zambia’s Katete Universal Pension

In “If you only have dust in your hands then friends are far; when they are full they come closer”: An Examination of the impacts of Zambia’s Katete universal pension,...

READ MORE  
blog icon

“Progress Can Kill” – on Rethinking Development

In this blog, Olivia Woxell challenges the current direction of development and its focus on economic growth. She argues that this direction is driven by western values and that development should not be a one-size fits all concept. Otherwise, it causes more harm than good. Olivia demonstrates the disastrous effects that development has brought indigenous communities. Once happily self-sufficient, their health and well-being then plummet, while rates of depression, addiction and suicide soar. Development and progress must be about freedom. It must allow people to live the lives that they want to lead. If it is repressive, then it is not development at all.

READ MORE